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3 myths about jump higher
#1
There are 3 myths about jumping higher that I want to clarify.

I’ve been obsessed with my vertical leap for 5 years and I learned quite a lot in that process.



1.) Having a high vertical leap is a born advantage



A lot of people think that players like Michael Jordan or Vince Carter had the genetic advantage

and they just had their way of jumping higher than anyone else. A lot of times people tend

to watch someone like Dr. J and say: Ooh gosh, he is so lucky with that talent. And what

people don’t realize is that Dr. J went through hours and hours of training and sweat and

dedication to reach that level. He said that himself.



2.) You should stop playing basketball when you’re doing a “vertical jump program”



That’s far from the truth. I mean, why would you? A lot of players often feel bad

because they see that after practice their vertical has actually decreased. Well,

that’s totally normal. You’re attacking a certain group of muscles and they get

separated in this weird way. They get developed and as a result, temporarily can’t

“serve you as well. In fact, if you notice that your jump has decreased that means

that you’re doing it right.



3.) Get the hardest program out there



In basketball, as in everything else in life, you have to lay the foundation.

You have to start small and build your way up. You have to start, for example

with 20 calf raises, 20 seconds with a jump rope and so on. Build the foundation.

Don’t go after these crazy programs that are just so exhausting that might get you

injured. They’re for more advanced athletes and a lot of times, that’s not the case with you.



Do you have any more?
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#2
3 myths about jump higher are commonly believed but, do not worry I am here to clear the air. Here are the top 3 myths that you should not believe.



I have increased my vertical to 35 inches and when I was in high school I barley had a 15 inch vertical so it can be done... No-one and I mean NO-ONE in my family can jump expect for me.



1. Genetics plays a huge role...

yes genes play a role in your ability to jump high but that does not mean if your family is not athletic you can't jump high. You juts have to work hard just like the player who has the "jumping" gene. There are vertical workout programs out there that will help you jump out the gym. I will link to a review of the best vertical jump program in the game. https://basketballmentality.com/vert-shock-review/



2. Shoes can make you jump higher...

Yes, if you have worn out shoes with no traction then you will be sliding everywhere and you can not get force to the ground to explode up. But that is just science, I am talking about lacing up some shoes and instantly increase your vertical by 5 inches. I found an article that goes over this a little better, and even goes through the APL shoes that were once banned from the NBA. https://basketballmentality.com/basketba...mp-higher/



3. You can't do it

Do not let anyone tell you that you can not jump higher!! If you do a program you can still play basketball and it's actually a good thing that you do to stay in game shape. You have to keep your muscles trained for the sport. Just believe in your self that you can jump higher no matter how tall you are, just look at Spud Webb and Nate Robinson.
Cick to get a free PDF on how to jump higher by 4"inches in under an hour!➡https://VericalJump.gr8.com/
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#3
Here are a few more myths:

1. Jumping higher doesn't do much for a sports player

A higher vertical is linked with greater athleticism, which as a sports player is crucial to playing effectively. This can be seen in the comparison between the vertical jump of basketball and football players. You'd expect basketball players to jump higher, but football players actually score higher on the jumping test during the combine, and that's only measuring their static jump (You can read more about that here). This difference lies largely in their approach to training, but it was training they had undergone that gave them such a high vertical (ergo more training means greater athleticism which leads to a higher jump).

2. Strength training is the way to a higher vertical

Let me clarify; strength training is for sure a very important component of achieving a higher vertical, there's no doubt about it. That being said, it's not the most important aspect to focus on, nor will it lead to the greatest gains. This is because weight training only improves your strength, whereas plyometric and jump-training exercises focus on both your speed and explosiveness. This is why programs like Vert Shock have managed to successfully get results for their users from the main program despite only using plyometric and jump-specific exercises. By focusing on both weight training and plyometrics, you can get the best of both worlds and really maximize your vertical. 

3. Your calves play a critical role in jumping higher

Not sure where this idea first started, likely from the ideas that Air Alert was propagating years back when it was popular, but today we know enough about our anatomy to know that the calves play a small role in the jumping process. The muscles that do most of the work are the glutes, hamstrings, and quads, which is why they're usually at the forefront of most jump training exercises. They make a significant impact on the height of your jump, so naturally, you'll want to develop these muscles to actually see notable improvements in the height of your jump.
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#4
(Nov 27, 2020, 9:47 pm)gabeball Wrote: Here are a few more myths:

1. Jumping higher doesn't do much for a sports player

A higher vertical is linked with greater athleticism, which as a sports player is crucial to playing effectively. This can be seen in the comparison between the vertical jump of basketball and football players. You'd expect basketball players to jump higher, but football players actually score higher on the jumping test during the combine, and that's only measuring their static jump (You can read more about that here). This difference lies largely in their approach to training, but it was training they had undergone that gave them such a high vertical (ergo more training means greater athleticism which leads to a higher jump).

Football players jump higher than basketball players? That's news to me. Apparently, it takes into account that a football player can lean on an opponent with his hand  Crazy
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#5
(Apr 21, 2020, 12:56 am)Unbeatable Hoops Wrote: 3 myths about jump higher are commonly believed but, do not worry I am here to clear the air. Here are the top 3 myths that you should not believe.



I have increased my vertical to 35 inches and when I was in high school I barley had a 15 inch vertical so it can be done... No-one and I mean NO-ONE in my family can jump expect for me.



1. Genetics plays a huge role...

    yes genes play a role in your ability to jump high but that does not mean if your family is not athletic you can't jump high. You juts have to work hard just like the player who has the "jumping" gene. There are vertical workout programs out there that will help you jump out the gym. I will link to a review of the best vertical jump program in the game. https://basketballmentality.com/vert-shock-review/



2. Shoes can make you jump higher...

    Yes, if you have worn out shoes with no traction then you will be sliding everywhere and you can not get force to the ground to explode up. But that is just science, I am talking about lacing up some shoes and instantly increase your vertical by 5 inches. I found an article that goes over this a little better, and even goes through the APL shoes that were once banned from the NBA.  https://basketballmentality.com/basketba...mp-higher/



3. You can't do it

    Do not let anyone tell you that you can not jump higher!! If you do a program you can still play basketball and it's actually a good thing that you do to stay in game shape. You have to keep your muscles trained for the sport. Just believe in your self that you can jump higher no matter how tall you are, just look at Spud Webb and Nate Robinson.

(Nov 27, 2020, 9:47 pm)gabeball Wrote: Here are a few more myths:

1. Jumping higher doesn't do much for a sports player

A higher vertical is linked with greater athleticism, which as a sports player is crucial to playing effectively. This can be seen in the comparison between the vertical jump of basketball and football players. You'd expect basketball players to jump higher, but football players actually score higher on the jumping test during the combine, and that's only measuring their static jump (You can read more about that here). This difference lies largely in their approach to training, but it was training they had undergone that gave them such a high vertical (ergo more training means greater athleticism which leads to a higher jump).

2. Strength training is the way to a higher vertical

Let me clarify; strength training is for sure a very important component of achieving a higher vertical, there's no doubt about it. That being said, it's not the most important aspect to focus on, nor will it lead to the greatest gains. This is because weight training only improves your strength, whereas plyometric and jump-training exercises focus on both your speed and explosiveness. This is why programs like Vert Shock have managed to successfully get results for their users from the main program despite only using plyometric and jump-specific exercises. By focusing on both weight training and plyometrics, you can get the best of both worlds and really maximize your vertical. 

3. Your calves play a critical role in jumping higher

Not sure where this idea first started, likely from the ideas that Air Alert was propagating years back when it was popular, but today we know enough about our anatomy to know that the calves play a small role in the jumping process. The muscles that do most of the work are the glutes, hamstrings, and quads, which is why they're usually at the forefront of most jump training exercises. They make a significant impact on the height of your jump, so naturally, you'll want to develop these muscles to actually see notable improvements in the height of your jump.

Thank you for shedding light on these myths! I'd like to add some thoughts:

  1. The importance of vertical jumps in sports: While the vertical jump can serve as a general indicator of athleticism, it's essential to recognize that different sports require varied skill sets. A basketball player and a football player, despite both being athletes, have different requirements. The ability to jump might be advantageous in certain situations for both, but other attributes like agility, speed, and endurance could play equally significant roles depending on the game scenario.
  2. Strength training vs. Plyometrics: I completely agree with you. Strength training lays down the foundation of raw power which, when combined with plyometric exercises, translates to explosiveness. While strength training alone might not result in the best vertical improvement, it can provide the necessary power that can be tapped into through plyometrics. It's akin to having a powerful engine (strength) and a good transmission system (plyometrics) in a car. You need both for optimal performance.
  3. Role of calves in jumping: Indeed, while calves contribute to the jump, the major powerhouses are the glutes, hamstrings, and quads. However, you can read about this on article here, one shouldn't underestimate the calf's contribution altogether. They act as stabilizers and can provide that last push in the jump. But, yes, for someone looking to significantly improve their vertical, focusing only on calf exercises wouldn't be the most efficient route.

Again, appreciate your insightful post! It's crucial to debunk these myths to help athletes train more effectively and safely.
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